Combustion

Combustion is an effective technique for odor control. The odor control efficiency of a combustion system depends largely on the level of complete combustion. Incomplete combustion can actually increase an odor problem by forming more odorous chemical compounds. Three major factors influence the design principles for odor emission control: temperature, residence time, and mixing. All three factors are interrelated to each other, and variation in one can cause changes in the others. Generally, temperatures of 1200 to 1400°F and residence times of 0.3 to 0.5 sec with good mixing conditions effectively destroy the odorous chemical compounds in a combustion chamber. If moisture and corrosion are not of concern, facilities often use the boiler onsite for odorant destruction.

Atmosphere

Atmosphere

Particulate NaOCl/NaOH

Matter

FIG. 5.27.1 Multiple-stage scrubber system schematic diagram.

Particulate NaOCl/NaOH

Matter

FIG. 5.27.1 Multiple-stage scrubber system schematic diagram.

Intermediate-Height Release
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