200

9.5 X 105 2.7 X 104 Moderate ~103 Moderate 2.5 X 106 6.5 X 103 High >105 High m

TABLE 11.26.2 OVERVIEW OF CLASSES A, B, AND C, WASTE CHARACTERISTICS

Characteristic Class A Waste Class B Waste Class C Waste

TABLE 11.26.2 OVERVIEW OF CLASSES A, B, AND C, WASTE CHARACTERISTICS

Characteristic Class A Waste Class B Waste Class C Waste

Concentration

low concentrations of radionuclides

higher concentrations of radionuclides

highest concentration of radionuclides

Waste Form

must meet minimum waste form requirements does not require stabilization (but may be stabilized)

must meet minimum waste form requirements requires stabilization for 300 years

must meet minimum waste form requirements requires stabilization for 300 years

Examples

typically contaminated protective clothing, paper, laboratory trash

typically resins and filters from nuclear power plants

typically nuclear reactor components, sealed sources, high activity industrial waste

Intruder Protection

after 100 years, decays to acceptable levels to an intruder requires no additional measures to protect intruder

after 100 years, decays to acceptable levels to an intruder, provided waste is recognizable requires stabilization to protect intruder

after 500 years, decays to acceptable levels to an intruder requires stabilization and deeper disposal (or barriers) to protect intruder

Segregation

unstable Class A must be segregated from Classes B and C

need not be segregated from Class C

need not be segregated from Class B

Below Regulatory Concern

Regulated by NRC

or States

Solar Stirling Engine Basics Explained

Solar Stirling Engine Basics Explained

The solar Stirling engine is progressively becoming a viable alternative to solar panels for its higher efficiency. Stirling engines might be the best way to harvest the power provided by the sun. This is an easy-to-understand explanation of how Stirling engines work, the different types, and why they are more efficient than steam engines.

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