Kcp

Glossary

Advanced analysis — Analysis predicting directly the stability of a structural system and its component members and not needing separate member capacity checks. ASD — Acronym for allowable stress design.

Beam columns — Structural members whose primary function is to carry axial force and bending moment.

Braced frame — Frame in which lateral deflection is prevented by braces or shear walls. Column — Structural member whose primary function is to carry axial force. CRC — Acronym for Column Research Council.

Drift — Lateral deflection of a building.

Ductility — Ability of a material to undergo a large deformation without a significant loss in strength. Factored load — The product of the nominal load and a load factor.

Flexural member — Structural member whose primary function is to carry bending moment.

Geometric imperfection — Unavoidable geometric error during fabrication and erection.

Limit state — A condition in which a structural or structural component becomes unsafe (strength limit state) or unfit for its intended function (serviceability limit state). Load factor — A factor to account for the unavoidable deviations of the actual load from its nominal value and uncertainties in structural analysis. LRFD — Acronym for load resistance factor design. Notional load — Load equivalent to geometric imperfection. PD — Acronym for plastic design.

Plastic hinge — A yield section of a structural member in which the internal moment is equal to the plastic moment of the cross-section. Plastic zone — A yield zone of a structural member in which the stress of a fiber is equal to the yield stress.

Refined plastic hinge analysis — Modified plastic hinge analysis accounting for gradual yielding of a structural member.

Resistance factors — A factor to account for the unavoidable deviations of the actual resistance of a member or a structural system from its nominal value. Second-order analysis — Analysis to use equilibrium equations based on the deformed geometry of a structure under load.

Semirigid connection — Beam-to-column connection whose behavior lies between fully rigid and ideally pinned connection. Service load — Nominal load under normal usage.

Stability function — Function to account for the bending stiffness reduction due to axial force. Stiffness — Force required to produce unit displacement.

Unbraced frame — Frame in which lateral deflections are not prevented by braces or shear walls.

References

[1] American Institute of Steel Construction. 2001. Load and Resistance Factor Design Specification, 3rd ed., Chicago.

[2] SSRC. 1981. General principles for the stability design of metal structures, Technical Memorandum No. 5, Civil Engineering, ASCE, February, pp. 53-54.

[3] Chen, W.F. and Lui, E.M. 1986. Structural Stability — Theory and Implementation, Elsevier, New York.

[4] Kanchanalai, T. 1977. The Design and Behavior of Beam-Columns in Unbraced Steel Frames, AISI Project No. 189, Report No. 2, Civil Engineering/Structures Research Lab., University of Texas at Austin.

[5] Hwa, K. 2003. Toward Advanced Analysis in Steel Frame Design, PhD dissertation, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI.

[6] Kim, S.E. 1996. Practical Advanced Analysis for Steel Frame Design, PhD thesis, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

[7] Liew, J.Y.R., White, D.W., and Chen, W.F. 1993. Second-order refined plastic hinge analysis of frame design: Part I, J. Struct. Eng., ASCE, 119(11), 3196-3216.

[8] Kishi, N. and Chen, W.F. 1990. Moment-rotation relations of semi-rigid connections with angles, J. Struct. Eng., ASCE, 116(7), 1813-1834.

[9] Kim, S.E. and Chen, W.F. 1996. Practical advanced analysis for steel frame design, ASCE Structural Congress XIV, Chicago, Special Proceeding Volume on Analysis and Computation, April, pp. 19-30.

[10] Chen, W.F., Kim, S.E., and Choi, S.H. 2001. Practical second-order inelastic analysis for three-dimensional steel frames, Steel Struct., 1, 213-223.

[11] Kim, S.E. and Lee, D.H. 2002. Second-order distributed plasticity analysis of space steel frames, Eng. Struct., 24, 735-744.

[12] Kim, S.E., Park, M.H., and Choi, S.H. 2001. Direct design of three-dimensional frames using practical advanced analysis, Eng. Struct., 23, 1491-1502.

[13] Avery, P. 1998. Advanced Analysis of Steel Frames Comprising Non-compact Sections, PhD thesis, School of Civil Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

[14] Kim, S.E. and Lee, J.H. 2001. Improved refined plastic-hinge analysis accounting for local buckling, Eng. Struct., 23, 1031-1042.

[15] Kim, S.E., Lee, J.H., and Park, J.S. 2002. 3D second-order plastic hinge analysis accounting for lateral torsional buckling, Int. J. Solids Struct., 39, 2109-2128.

[16] Wongkeaw, K. and Chen, W.F. 2002. Consideration of out-of-plane buckling in advanced analysis for planar steel frame design, J. Constr. Steel Res., 58, 943-965.

[17] Liew, J.Y.R., White, D.W., and Chen, W.F. 1993. Second-order refined plastic-hinge analysis for frame design: Part 2, J. Struct. Eng., ASCE, 119(11), 3217-3237.

[18] Chen, W.F. and Lui, E.M. 1992. Stability Design of Steel Frames, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.

[19] Liew, J.Y.R. 1992. Advanced Analysis for Frame Design, PhD thesis, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

[20] Kishi, N., Goto, Y., Chen, W.F., and Matsuoka, K.G. 1993. Design aid of semi-rigid connections for frame analysis, Eng. J., AISC, 4th quarter, 90-107.

[21] ECCS. 1991. Essentials ofEurocode 3 Design Manual for Steel Structures in Building, ECCS-Advisory Committee 5, No. 65.

[22] ECCS. 1984. Ultimate Limit State Calculation of Sway Frames with Rigid Joints, Technical Committee 8 — Structural stability technical working group 8.2-system, Publication No. 33.

[23] Standards Australia. 1990. AS4100-1990, Steel Structures, Sydney, Australia.

[24] Canadian Standard Association. 1994. Limit States Design of Steel Structures, CAN/CSA-S16.1-M94.

[25] Canadian Standard Association. 1989. Limit States Design of Steel Structures, CAN/CSA-S16.1-M89.

[26] Kim, S.E. and Chen, W.F. 1996. Practical advanced analysis for braced steel frame design, J. Struct. Eng., ASCE, 122(11), 1266-1274.

[27] Kim, S.E. and Chen, W.F. 1996. Practical advanced analysis for unbraced steel frame design, J. Struct. Eng., ASCE, 122(11), 1259-1265.

[28] Maleck, A.E., White, D.W., and Chen, W.F. 1995. Practical application of advanced analysis in steel design, Proc. 4th Pacific Structural Steel Conf., Vol. 1, Steel Structures, pp. 119-126.

[29] White, D.W. and Chen, W.F., Eds. 1993. Plastic Hinge Based Methods for Advanced Analysis and Design of Steel Frames: An Assessment of the State-of-the-art, SSRC, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA.

[30] Kim, S.E. and Chen, W.F. 1996. Practical advanced analysis for semi-rigid frame design, Eng. J., AISC, 33(4), 129-141.

[31] Kim, S.E. and Chen, W.F. 1996. Practical advanced analysis for frame design — Case study, SSSS J., 6(1), 61-73.

[32] American Institute of Steel Construction. 1994. Load and Resistance Factor Design Specification, 2nd ed., Chicago.

[33] American Institute of Steel Construction. 1986. Load and Resistance Factor Design Specification for Structural Steel Buildings, Chicago.

[34] LeMessurier, W.J. 1977. A practical method of second order analysis, Part 2 — Rigid Frames. Eng. J., AISC, 2nd quarter, 14(2), 49-67.

[35] Vogel, U. 1985. Calibrating frames, Stahlbau, 10, 1-7.

[36] Stelmack, T.W. 1982. Analytical and Experimental Response of Flexibly-Connected Steel Frames, MS dissertation, Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado.

[37] Chen, W.F. and Kim, S.E. 1997. LRFD Steel Design Using Advanced Analysis, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.

[38] Ad Hoc Committee on Serviceability. 1986. Structural serviceability: a critical appraisal and research needs, J. Struct. Eng., ASCE, 112(12), 2646-2664.

[39] Ellingwood, B.R. 1989. Serviceability Guidelines for Steel Structures, Eng. J., AISC, 26, 1st Quarter, 1 -8.

[40] White, D.W. 1993. Plastic hinge methods for advanced analysis of steel frames, J. Constr. Steel Res., 24(2), 121-152.

[41] Cook, R.D., Malkus, D.S., and Plesha, M.E. 1989. Concepts and Applications of Finite Element Analysis, 3rd ed., John Wiley & Sons, New York.

[42] Hughes, T.J.R. 1987. The Finite Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

[43] American Institute of Steel Construction. 2002. Seismic Provisions for Structural Steel Buildings, Chicago.

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