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a Ratification, accession, approval, or acceptance. k Succession.

Sources: Soud, H. N., Developments in FGD, IEA Coal Research, London, 2000; Wu, Z., NOx Control for Pulverized Coal Fired Power Stations, IEA Coal Research, London, 2002. With permission.

a Ratification, accession, approval, or acceptance. k Succession.

Sources: Soud, H. N., Developments in FGD, IEA Coal Research, London, 2000; Wu, Z., NOx Control for Pulverized Coal Fired Power Stations, IEA Coal Research, London, 2002. With permission.

sets emission ceilings for SO2, NOx, volatile organic compounds, and ammonia for the year 2010.

On November 24, 1998, the EC adopted the Large Combustion Plants Directive (LCPD) and, with an amendment in December 1994, has set targets and emission limits for air pollutants, including SO2, for plants >50 megawatts thermal (MWt) for both exiting and new facilities. Revisions to the directive are proposing stricter SO2 and NOx emission ceilings to be achieved by the year 2010, and regulations on smaller-sized units are being discussed [49]. In 1996, the European Union Environment Ministers adopted a Directive on Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) [49]. The directive came into force in October 1996, mandated implementation by October 1999, and applies to all new installations and those undergoing a substantial change. The main purpose of the IPPC directive is to achieve integrated prevention and control of air pollution.

In most countries, the legislators target new and large facilities. More than 30 countries have adopted or are in the processing of introducing legislation limiting SO2 emissions from their coal-fired power plants [49]. A range of national emissions standards for sulfur emissions is given in Table 4-8 [49].

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