549

Total

100,219

84,907

90,017

275,143

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, U.S. Coal Reserves: 1997 Update, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., February 1999.

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, U.S. Coal Reserves: 1997 Update, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., February 1999.

and Future Role of Coal), where coal production by region is discussed. The option of using lower sulfur coal has resulted in a large increase in western coal production and use. Table 6-6 illustrates the distribution of sulfur in U.S. coals by region [9].

The relationship between sulfur content in the coal and pounds of sulfur per million Btu is provided in Table 6-7 for comparison. This listing, developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), is used for approximate correlations with New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments criteria. With the exception of the low-sulfur coal, which meets NSPS requirements, the medium- and high-sulfur coals require control strategies. This includes emission reduction technologies or offsets through sulfur dioxide allowances.

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