52 Twin Shaft Gas Microturbines 521 Configuration

Two-shaft MTs follow an industrial equipment design philosophy similar to that used for chillers, boilers, or furnaces. They are built to meet utilitygrade reliability and durability standards while producing electricity at least as efficiently as central generation and distribution technologies currently in use. Two-shaft MTs are designed exclusively for rugged, industrial-quality stationary applications; they fit right in on the plant floor or utility room and include no design compromises inherited from vehicle or aerospace ancestries.

Like single-shaft MT engines, two-shaft designs typically employ metallic radial turbomachinery components. They use "ruggedized" turbocharger components featuring pressurized lube-oil systems consistent with industrial best practice. They operate at relatively low pressure ratios in the 3:1 range using one stage of compression and two turbine stages (Figure 5.6). The first turbine (the gasifier turbine) drives the compressor and the second free-power turbine drives the load generator.

FIGURE 5.5

Generic part load efficiency curves for MTs; the efficiency is shown as a function of the fraction of full load power along the abscissa for two control approaches.

FIGURE 5.5

Generic part load efficiency curves for MTs; the efficiency is shown as a function of the fraction of full load power along the abscissa for two control approaches.

FIGURE 5.6

Typical two-shaft microturbine cycle diagram.

FIGURE 5.6

Typical two-shaft microturbine cycle diagram.

Solar Stirling Engine Basics Explained

Solar Stirling Engine Basics Explained

The solar Stirling engine is progressively becoming a viable alternative to solar panels for its higher efficiency. Stirling engines might be the best way to harvest the power provided by the sun. This is an easy-to-understand explanation of how Stirling engines work, the different types, and why they are more efficient than steam engines.

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